Category Archives: Insight

WORLD PRIDE MONTH – DIVERSITY AND INCLUSIVITY IS MORE THAN A BUSINESS OBJECTIVE

 

Despite nearly 500 LGBT+ events being cancelled or postponed this year due to Covid-19, Pride Month remains as important as ever with its message of acceptance ringing no truer than now. At the same time, the Black Lives Matter movement has challenged the world on its mistreatment of the black community, highlighting that we still have a long way to go in achieving a fair and equal society. The movement has forced businesses around the world to look at their own history, behaviours and actions to reassess whether they truly implement diversity and inclusivity practices throughout their companies. One thing is for certain, this is not the time for D&I to take a back seat.

Fast Company, NBC and The Drum, to name just a few publications, have reported throughout the pandemic on companies cutting diversity and inclusion budgets, staff and support as they enter crisis mode.

Reports from the National Women’s Law Centre and Barnett Waddingham have highlighted that those who D&I measures are meant to protect and support have been the worst effected by furloughs and redundancies. So how and why has D&I been deemed ‘non-essential’ and the first to be cut from business plans?

Some have claimed that government measures have made it hard for companies to be held to account with the Government Equalities Office (GEO) and the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) suspending gender pay gap regulations this year for the first time since its introduction in 2017. Or perhaps companies are failing to see how crucial people are to their resilience?

Something businesses in the B Corp community already know to be true and is now becoming clearer for the wider corporate sector: thosewho make short term objectives and fail to place people at the heart of the decision, will suffer the consequences. Recent reports from McKinsey revealed that companies with the most gender-diverse executive teams were 21% more likely to have industry lead profitability, and companies with ethnically and culturally diverse executive teams were 33% more likely to outperform on profitability. The most telling statistic is that companies in the bottom quartile for both gender as well as ethnic and cultural diversity were 29% less likely to achieve above-average profitability.

In times of crisis, companies that endorse workplace diversity and inclusion not only survive but can even thrive. Research from Great Place to Work has shown that companies with consistently inclusive workplaces thrived before, during, and after the Great Recession, earning a four times annualised return.

The business case for diversity and inclusion could not be any clearer, it has been proven time and time again that a diverse workforce leads to greater innovation, creativity and profitability.

For Gong Communications, encouraging truly diverse and inclusive workforces and cultures has been important to us throughout our 15 year history. A certified B-Corp since 2017, our core business is targeted at supporting clients who are focussed on positive impact for planet, people as well as profit.

We have had the pleasure of playing a part in the diversity and inclusion journey of the insurance sector, through our work with Lloyd’s of London and the Dive In Festival – the festival of diversity and inclusion within the insurance sector, now in its 6th year.  When Inclusion@Lloyd’s came to us in 2015, asking us to help in bringing to life the first sector-wide diversity and inclusion festival, we saw the opportunity to be part of something special.

Since that first year, the festival has grown exponentially from its origin in London and now takes place in over 60 cities and 30 countries world-wide, attracting more than 10,000 people. But it is not all about the numbers. Powerful personal stories at the Dive In festival have also made it easier to normalise discussions about issues such as gender equality, family care responsibilities and mental wellbeing at work.

It has prompted organisations to implement initiatives and policies designed to create a more inclusive workplace culture. Last year Lloyd’s issued its trans and non-binary inclusion guide, a 29-page document offering advice to people working within the insurance sector about how to foster a “stable emotional working environment” for trans and non-binary colleagues. Aviva revised its policy for trans people to become more inclusive, now allowing the parents of trans children time off to support the transition.

As a leading diversity communications PR agency in the UK, we’ve long understood that fostering diversity and inclusivity is not only the right thing to do, but should be at the heart of a company’s strategy and is the key to continued corporate resilience.

WORLD ENVIRONMENT DAY 5 JUNE 2020 – CONSUMED BY CARBON

 

World Environment Day has prompted us here at Gong to reflect on the issue so many businesses are grappling with at the moment: How to get to Net Zero carbon dioxide emissions using science based methods as fast as we can? In December last year at COP25, alongside 499 other B Corps, Gong pledged to get to Net Zero by 2025 at the very latest. Spurred on by Covid and the imperative to Build Back Better, we are determined to do it this year.

Unlike the growing number of multinational corporations and manufacturing businesses who have pledged, it’s relatively easy for a small service business like ours to figure out our carbon footprint and make the necessary reductions. But there are ‘hidden’ emissions, even for us. We’ve learned for example, from fellow B Corp Wholegrain Digital, about the relative energy intensity of different web site constructions (if the internet was a country, it would be the world’s sixth biggest polluter). So we’ve committed to curb bad digital communications habits along with obvious things like reducing international travel, buying renewable energy and sourcing as much as we can from other Net Zero B Corps.

177 multinational companies, including Nestlé, Unilever and Vodafone signed up to the UN pledge to be Net Zero by 2050. That figure has continued to grow through 2020. Sustainability heads at businesses are working flat out to reduce their own emissions and track those of their suppliers (referred to as different ‘scopes’ 1,2 and 3) but many are facing up to the fact that they will struggle to change their current business practices enough to get to net zero in the time available. And this isn’t an arbitrary date. We have by best estimates, nine years left to act on carbon concentrations before we irreversibly head into warming that exceeds the ‘liveable’ 2°C target set in Paris.

As we have been thinking about this, we’ve started working with a new client which has given us the opportunity to delve further into the carbon removal movement. It’s been an eye opener which is why we want to share it. Human carbon emissions total 40 gigatonnes per year (Gt/y). Earth (forests, soil, oceans) can only absorb 20 Gt/y of this hence the concentration of greenhouse gases keeps increasing. So even though emissions have been lower during lockdown, CO2 concentrations are still rising.

Experts, including The World Resources Institute (WRI) and the UN IPCC are encouraging us to look at carbon dioxide removal (CDR) rather than offsetting. Sustainability expert John Grant explained that when you buy offsets, you are often funding a project that produces or uses energy more efficiently, but emissions still occur. It doesn’t reduce the already too high concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Scientific removal and lock-up of CO2 now, for a minimum of 50 years, will give us time to shift to a less CO2 intensive world and mitigate climate change.

The WRI says ‘2020 could be the year Carbon Dioxide Removal takes off.” UN IPCC (2018) says: “All pathways that limit global warming to 1.5°C with limited or no overshoot project the use of carbon dioxide removal (CDR) of the order of 100–1000 Gt CO2 over the 21st century. CDR would be used to compensate for residual emissions and, in most cases, achieve net negative emissions to return global warming to 1.5°C following a peak.”

This week, another company, Climeworks announced that it had raised $76m to expand its operations to ‘suck’ CO2 out of the air and turn it into products such as gas for carbonating Coca-Cola. While this particular use of CO2 makes it back into the atmosphere, other Climeworks processes do store CO2 permanently. But we are encouraged by a different (and healthier) approach, espoused by our client PURO.earth that supports businesses whose core processes are carbon net negative. In other words, they use carbon dioxide in the manufacture of building materials such as ‘carbstone’ and biochar soil improvers – two sectors – construction and agriculture – that are big enough to be able to scale rapidly to really make a difference.

Craig Sams, one half of the pioneering duo behind the original fairtrade chocolate brand Green and  Black’s, set up biochar company (and B Corp) Carbon Gold. A former Chair of the Soil Association, Sams is an evangelist for the regenerative properties of biochar on soil.

And for anyone who needs the science, here’s a helpful video about CO2 mineralisation of waste materials from steel manufacture in the production of sustainable construction materials.

What’s exciting is that we can remove CO2 now by paying companies like these to scale faster by buying carbon removal certificates through the PURO.earth marketplace. We get to be net negative now, which means that Gong is no longer going to be part of the problem. Of course it still needs the global construction industry to use more of these products and for farmers and cities to use biochar instead of polluting fertilisers. But with the momentum from the Build Back Better movement and the European Green Deal stimulus, it suddenly feels like there is real hope that we can find solutions that are also going to build a new green economy and ecosystem of entrepreneurs.

And that’s good for everyone. Happy World Environment Day.

WATCH THE (GREEN) BIRDIE

 

There is something about the sustainability pioneer John Elkington’s new book, Green Swans; The Coming Boom in Regenerative Capitalismthat brings joy as one scans the contents pages. The title unapologetically riffs off the idea of Black Swans – the extreme, the unknown, and very improbable events – described in a book of that name published just before the global financial crisis of 2008.

The twitch at the corners of the mouth when you read is less to do with the subject matter – though this is ultimately an inherently optimistic read – and more because of the fun that John has obviously had with the analogy. Halfway into the book, there’s a section called ‘New Pecking Orders’ – he’s really in his stride now – with sections called ‘Incubating Ugly Ducklings’ and ‘Exponential Migrations’.

All levity aside, Green Swansputs our current challenges into context by setting out the very serious ‘Black Swans’ that we currently face including: Plastic in the oceans, killer calories and climate change. Despite the complexity of the issues, it is not all bad news, mostly because the book is packed with John’s anecdotes and his clever aggregation and framing of ideas about how and where remedies are likely to appear.

The book draws from themes derived from the work carried out by Volans, the future-business consultancy which John co-founded, in its inquiry series: Tomorrow’s Capitalism. The Inquiry kicked off with a recall of the Triple Bottom Line mid-2018, the first ever ‘product recall’ of a management theory. In a blog on Harvard Business Review, John called for re-think and withdrew People, Profit, Planet, concluding it was longer fit for purpose. Together with his colleagues at Volans, he sought to reboot the concept identifying the ‘3Rs’ as its worthy successor: Resilience, Responsibility, and Regeneration are the vital characteristics, Volans argues, of the business systems of the future.

Despite the gravity of the issues, John manages to keep the text from getting too weighed down. He talks about how during his long career as an advisor to CEOs and embattled leaders, he has often used humour in Boardrooms as an unexpected tactic that gets people to drop their guard and focus on unpalatable truths.

The book is packed full of references that resonate reassuringly for businesses grappling with formulating their own response to the emergent future. And while the Covid-19 pandemic rages all around us, there is something strangely calming in thinking that this Black Swan event could end up giving flight to some very welcome and significant Green Swans.

As the book notes, “For the foreseeable future, this will be by far the biggest opportunity for adventure, growth, and evolution in the tightly coupled stories of humankind, capitalism, and our home planet, Earth.”

Green Swans, The Coming Boom in Regenerative Capitalism, was published on 9 April by Fast Company Press and is available to buy on Amazon or direct from the Volans website.

DIVE IN – 5 YEARS ON

Five years ago, Gong sat with the Inclusion@Lloyd’s committee, the steering group for diversity and inclusion strategy, governance and best practice in the Lloyd’s market, to plan a D&I festival for the London insurance market: the Dive In festival.

From day one we knew we were involved in something special; it was the first time the sector had ever come together on this scale, putting competition aside to address culture and the attractiveness of its industry. Little did we know that this was the creation of something quite phenomenal: a global movement that supports the development of inclusive workplace cultures.

The appetite for more was apparent from day one, as events hit capacity within the 24hours of registration opening. When it was decided the festival should continue annually, the requests for it to be replicated internationally came in thick and fast. Dive In festival went on to reach global heights, expanding exponentially from 10 countries in 2016 to over 60 cities in 30 countries in 2019, breaking new ground with events in countries such as Nigeria, Bahrain, and Indonesia. By creating a central comms strategy, handbooks, toolkits and standardised branding for the festival, Gong helped to ensure that Dive In could become a distinguished global brand.

Outside the insurance industry, the message that the sector is working hard to change was getting out. Media coverage of the festival in City AM, Financial Times, and Forbes, plus blanket coverage across the insurance trades, showed the dial was shifting in insurance. The awards kept flowing: Dive In picked up award wins from British Insurance, Insurance Times, Insurance Day, Marketing Week, CorpComms magazine, PRCA and accrued shortlist commendations from Guardian Sustainable Business, Sabre Awards, ENEI and, CIPR. Most recently the festival was recognised by City AM who awarded Dive In its inaugural Outreach, Inclusion, and Diversity award.

As Dive In reached its fifth year this year, it gave us cause to reflect on the achievements and the impact made. We reflected on how far the conversation had moved on, from building the business case for D&I, to drawing back the curtain on more challenging topics like mental health, domestic abuse, and fertility. Inspiring stories told by well-known celebrities and expertise from industry specialists helped shift the focus from awareness, to action, to impact.

Working with our long-term video partners, Striker Productions, Gong created a video capturing the history of the Dive In festival, reflecting on its impact. We are incredibly proud of the involvement Gong has had in the Dive In festival for the last five years – we hope you can see why…

B INSPIRED EVENT REPORT – PART ONE

The Bridge theatre on London’s Southbank played host to a 600-strong audience for B Lab UK’s first B Inspired event on Thursday 10th October. Global circumnavigator, Fergal o’Nuillian, a geography teacher and explorer, opened the event with the poignant image of the earth rising in space.  He told a story about one of his students who against the odds, passed his geography GCSE. He set the tone for the event by reflecting that like the advice to his teacher from this young man, we must all learn to practise hope on a daily basis.

Fergal didn’t come alone. Students from City Heights Academy gave voice to his assertion that it is hard to be young at the moment. At his invitation, the audience leaned in and listened closely to a young woman in her school uniform – KatiAnn Barris Rocha whose spoken word poetry blistered eloquently against the expectations society places on her generation. The audience got to its feet in appreciation of her performance.

The first panel – Challenging Business as Usual was made up of Oxford University Professor and expert on corporate purpose, Colin Mayer; Alexandra Mousavizadeh, of Tortoise Media, Sophi Tranchell, the founder of Divine Chocolate and Chair, James Perry, Cook co-founder and man who brought the B Corp movement to the UK.

Colin laid out the historical context for our current situation: Fifty years of Milton Friedman economic theory and the primacy of shareholder value creation as the legal requirement and core purpose of business. He contended that the capitalist system is not fit for our current needs and must change to generate profits only for the companies whose solutions are benefitting people and planet. He used the example of Danish pharma company Novonordisk, explain how they switched their purpose from manufacturing insulin to eliminating diabetes.

Alexandra explained the robust methodology by which her new Responsibility 100 index has been compiled. She cited 5000 data points, 52 indicators, 27 of which are directly relevant for corporations mapping progress through an SDG prism. The Index is a window into corporate rhetoric versus reality, making it easy to see who has signed up to the UN global compact for example, and then analysing any resulting actions in what she called a ‘talk versus walk’ score. She defended the Index format because it ‘creates a race to the top’  and highlights gaps in data and performance. Perhaps the most sobering observation is that it should not be hard to find evidence of corporate contribution to SDGs but it is.

Sophi Tranchell’s contribution expanded on a core theme from Colin’s observations – ownership. She reflected on 20 years of Divine Chocolate – back then a model that drew a lot of scepticism that having cocoa farmers the biggest shareholders (44%) could ever work. That ownership has been key in diversification and mitigation for climate change because the farmers are closest to the issues and empowered to make the necessary changes. Sophi spoke up for the need for patient capital, long term investors and engaged consumers. Divine certified as a B Corp in 2016.

James Perry summarised that ‘business has the wrong operating system’, reflecting on how we think about performance reporting. Tomorrow’s economic rule book needs new rules of the game. We need a legal system that recognises the role of owners (shareholders) as trustees. Change comes quickest when companies are required to report. Regulatory requirements such as publishing pay differentials or ensuring the living wage is paid all through the supply chain would be helpful.

Event report: Refugees: Changing the Conversation to Untapped Talent and Greater Inclusion

 

On 16 October we heard from three speakers with very different routes into the world of refugees:

Paul Hutchings, Co-Founder of Refugee Support, a former market research agency boss who gave it all up to focus full time on running a charity providing aid with dignity; Dina Nayeri, author and a child refugee at the age of eight, and Mike Butcher, editor at large of Techcrunch, chronicler of technology entrepreneurs and founder of Techfugees. The insights they gave us in their conversations and story telling fell into three main take-aways:

View full report here. 

Business as a force for good – are we at a tipping point?

Business as a force for good – are we at a tipping point?

On 19 August, the Business Roundtable, a group of leading CEOs of the largest corporations in the USA, agreed a new purpose beyond creating value for shareholders. The ‘Statement on the purpose of a corporation’ was signed by almost 200 members, including Jeff Bezos (Amazon) and Tim Cook (Apple). This move signals a significant shift away from the short term thinking fuelled by quarterly reporting in the capital markets. It enables CEOs to balance the interests of all stakeholders with those of shareholders. This means that employees, suppliers, the wider community, the environment and society at large can be factored into board-level decision-making. What’s interesting is that among all of the brands tuned into consumer pressure, the Round Table is currently led by Jamie Dimon, CEO of the financial institution, JPMorgan Chase.

The founders of B Lab penned a response in FastCompany inviting the Roundtable CEOs to become B Corps, pointing out that the movement they founded a decade ago offers CEOs a tried, trusted and practical route to achieving these goals, aligned with the SDGs. In order to be certified as a B Corp, organisations complete the B Impact Assessment (BIA). This free online tool is available to view at www.bimpactassessment.net. It helps build more balanced businesses by asking questions about 5 key areas of operation: Governance, workers, supply chain, community, and the environment, moving beyond certifying products, to certifying the ethics and actions of entire organisations.

These events are playing out against a dramatic backdrop. From 20 -27 September businesses are being encouraged to down tools and take to the streets to protest for the accelerated end of fossil fuels in a Global Climate Strike. The web site features young activist, Greta Thunberg with the line ‘If not you, who, If not now, when?’

Visit the Extinction Rebellion web site and you are greeted with ‘International Rebellion begins Monday 7 October’ In the year since Greta Thunberg stopped going to school to protest against the lack of Government action on the Climate Emergency, different groups have mobilised 1.6 million students across the world to strike for the same cause. #FridaysForFutures has become a globally active movement.

The actions of the Business Roundtable, B Lab’s response, the press coverage it has generated and the many events that are planned (eg. B Inspired in London in October) plus all of the communication about the Global Climate Strike are still just a handful of initiatives among so many that are underway around the world. It really does feel as though we are set for a new order of business. But what does that mean for corporate reputation?

The comments on the Business Roundtable statement and the resulting press coverage have focused on the need for deeds not only words. Anyone who works in corporate communications will understand that for a company and its CEO, signing up to something as significant as the end of shareholder value creation primacy is, in fact, a big deal. Companies know that their stakeholders are listening and will hold them to account. It feels wrong to characterize this move in terms of winners and losers because the stakes are high for everyone. But there is nevertheless a sense of expectation in the air that it is time for companies who want to be out in front to do more than advocate for change.  It’s time for businesses to take action and be the change that the world needs.

INFLUENTIAL VOICES IN UK WASTE MANAGEMENT 2019

INFLUENTIAL VOICES IN UK WASTE MANAGEMENT 2019

With the ‘Attenborough effect’ propelling waste management companies into the public spotlight, it’s never been such a critical time for these companies to shape the direction of policy and commercial discussions.

Gong Communications recently highlighted 12 of our favourite waste management organisations in the UK based on their approaches to communications between 2018 and 2019. Our ‘Influential Voices in Waste Management 2019’ paper is a concise, 7-page analysis of which companies are excelling in their proactive engagement. Taking an outside perspective, focus areas include companies’ commentary on news and key issues, thought-leadership initiatives as well as their on-and-offline presence.

Our checklist also provides some pointers on how companies can turn the growing pressure to demonstrate innovation and adaptation into an opportunity to showcase best practice, build reputational resilience and stimulate supply chain collaboration.

 

Event report: Diversity & Inclusion for asset managers

 

D&I for fund managers was our 6th event focused on the link between reputation and culture. This time we focused on the asset management community and private equity in particular with a panel representing the views of investors and advisors who believe that the time has come for firms to focus on their own D&I, not only that of their portfolio companies.

From a reputation perspective we believe it is important for firms to communicate to stakeholders that they are acting on D&I, even if they are currently far from perfect. Better to convey the message that your firm is an engaged improver than a head-in-the-sand denier. As the FRC articulated in its report on the state of FTSE reporting, ‘At one end, a sophisticated understanding of diversity as the best utilisation of talent and a significant strategic issue is evident. At the other end, a lack of engagement, leading to a minimalistic, ‘tick-box’ approach.’ From our perspective, there are plenty of ways to get the message out there as well as to engage on D&I issues internally.

The purpose backlash and why it’s important

 

Check out social media, flick on the radio or read a business publication and you will find new evidence every day that the global apocalypse is coming, whether it’s the disappearance of insects, or the melting of the glaciers. It’s basically all terrifying.

Companies that can articulate what they are doing to help mitigate the long list of threats to our very existence: climate change, plastic and food waste, poverty, etc. are quietening their activist shareholders and cheering us all up in the process.

As part of this effort to line up on the side of the hopeful, many more businesses are finding and communicating their ‘corporate purpose’ which seems to be motivated by 3 main objectives:

  • Build brand loyalty among customers
  • Attract and retain talent – particularly ‘millennials’
  • And post ‘that’ BlackRock letter from Larry Fink; keep activist investors happy

But it’s not always easy to summon up a ‘purpose’ that people are going to buy into if you haven’t ever got beyond ‘market share’ or some other financial measure. Let’s face it, most businesses in this tricky global economy (and in the Brexit plagued UK) deserve a parade for simply staying afloat.

This would not be so bad except for the fact that there is a cohort of entrepreneurs globally founding companies that have purpose baked into their core business models. Everyone has their favourite examples, some of mine are TOMS (a pair of shoes donated for every pair purchased),  ToastAle (beer made from bread waste), InspiraFarms (off-grid cold chain) and Global Parametrics (insurance inclusion for poor rural farmers) –  I could go on to list many amazing companies innovating in areas such as renewable energy, sustainable food sources, sustainable farming, I’m sure you get the picture.

The issue here is that anyone who cares about the plight of the planet and our species survival (not to put too fine a point on it), naturally wants to spend their days working for an organisation that is part of the solution, not adding to the problem.

So there really is an ungainly tussle going on for the brightest and most engaged new workers.  Alongside this pressure is the knowledge that customers, business or consumer, also naturally want to reward ‘good’ companies with their patronage. And if that wasn’t enough, the largest asset owners are choosing investment managers based on their ESG credentials – basically how well they pay attention to Environmental, Social and Governance impacts.

Movements like B Corp are approaching a tipping point with a globally understood process for identifying ‘good’ companies through a detailed certification system. Now that some of the biggest (and coolest) companies are on board (Danone, Natura, Patagonia etc.), the sceptics are coming around. Or are they?

Anand Giridharadas, author of the book, Winners Take All  sets out a useful challenge to the notion of corporate do-gooding that also helps separate the different ways companies approach the issue.

His thinking is that corporate philanthropy and purpose are often more about the optics than any real systemic change to the way companies have always behaved to their various stakeholders. His pushback is that rather than ‘purpose’ as an afterthought, (supporting youth initiatives for example), if companies paid their lowest paid workers more, or eschewed zero hours contracts, families would be better placed to look after their dependents without corporate philanthropy.

His is not a lone voice. At the World Economic Forum in January, Dutch Historian, Rutger Bregman departed from the expected script on a TIME panel, noting how people in Davos talked about sustainability but flew there in 150 private jets and raised issues on participation, justice, equality and transparency, but “nobody raises the issue of tax avoidance and the rich not paying their share.”

Speaking truth to power is an essential part of advising on corporate purpose. It’s not OK to exploit one stakeholder group, like squeezing suppliers for 90-day payment terms, and then making a big song and dance about a campaign to support entrepreneurs. That amounts to robbing from Peter to make a very public self-serving gesture to Paul. It’s also going to end in tears because the very people that companies are seeking to impress (the bright young things and loyal customers) will pretty quickly catch a whiff of this reputational disconnect and opt out.

The corporate conscience realm of CSR (corporate social responsibility) and corporate philanthropy
(giving some of the profits back to good causes) – are gradually yielding to a more holistic practice given a label in financial circles of ESG – a way of measuring the positive impacts that are created by the business.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, when ESG standards translate into financial incentives, more senior executives start to sit up and take notice. In September last year, the FT reported that Danone was the first multi-national corporation to tie its risk rating to its cost of capital. Global ratings agencies (like Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s) are now accepting B Corp certification as due diligence of a high standard of ESG performance, acknowledging that it will lead to a business being genuinely more sustainable in the long term. As a result, the piece noted a €2bn Positive Incentive Loan (PIL) issued by Danone in February 2018 attracted a discount – or put more simply, Danone was rewarded for its B Corp commitments by paying less for its credit.

The last word on purpose has to go to the SDGs – the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, which have helped create a consistent global framework for action. What’s important about movements like B Corp and the SDGs is that they are galvanising business leaders and entrepreneurs around the stuff that’s really important. In the midst of all these efforts to contribute positively, it is important to look for signs that companies are balanced in their commitments and not jumping on a purpose bandwagon. But a note of caution, choose wisely – we don’t have enough time to sit back and see how this plays out, there’s just too much at stake.

Narda Shirley is Founder & MD of London and Nairobi based Gong Communications and a B Corp Ambassador.

This article was first published by the IPRA https://www.ipra.org/news/itle/itl-312-corporate-purpose-why-the-backlash-is-important/