Tag Archives: Mauritius

IFC

BRAND PERCEPTION AND STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT

Gong has been working with the International Finance Corporation, the private sector arm of the World Bank, since 2017. Working alongside the IFC teams and government ministries in Africa has given us deep insight into the workings of Development Finance Institutions (DFIs) and in managing complex stakeholder relationships.

One recent multi-stakeholder brief included building a communications strategy in the natural resources sector for a middle income African country. After conducting an extensive stakeholder mapping exercise and in-depth qualitative and quantitative research, we delivered a successful strategic comms plan within a designated three-month timeframe.

The market that had bankers at Davos excited this year was Africa

 

Isabelle Alenus-Crosby

This is what Peter Sands, CEO of Standard Chartered, told Reuters at the World Economic Forum last Friday.

Many African politicians attended the Forum, above all to present their nations in a positive light and thus attract more investors.

The heads of state and government from Guinea, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Rwanda, Tanzania, Kenya and Mauritius all debated the future of their continent over dinner. The event was called an “Interactive Dinner Session”, and journalists were not allowed in. Only entrepreneurs and investors were. South Africa and Nigeria, the biggest economic powers in Africa south of the Sahara, didn’t feel the need to attend the dinner, but instead focused on promoting agriculture in their respective countries. Feeding Africa seems high on their agenda, following the expected population explosion. Nigeria intends to modernize its agriculture via large-scale investment programmes, knowing that its Human Resources are more important to the country’s future than its oil. The aim is to become self-sufficient and eventually an exporter.

One point where everyone agreed was that if Africa were to invest heavily into infrastructure, it could uplift all people still living in poverty.

Some studies suggest that some $100 billion (74.2 billion euros) would have to be invested each year to achieve real improvement, and African representatives at the Davos forum hoped to raise awareness for the issue. They argued that whoever fails to invest in Africa today, will be sorry tomorrow. And almost all attendees seemed to agree with them.

Finally, the European Central Bank president Mario Draghi ended the Forum by stating that “positive contagion” on financial markets was not yet feeding into the economy at large, but that the eurozone should see recovery in the second half of the year.

Good news all round…